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PIR Review of The Very Idea of a Critique of Pure Reason

Philosophy in Review has just published an excellent review of my book Immanuel Kant: The Very Idea of a Critique of Pure Reason by Sam Stoner of Assumption College. Sam’s account of the structure and argument of the book is very accurate and he raises very good questions about 1) the relation between Kant’s critique and practical philosophy and 2) the reflexivity of Kant’s critique and its relation to self-knowledge. Check it out!

Critique Review of The Very Idea of a Critique of Pure Reason

Another review of Immanuel Kant: The Very Idea of a Critique of Pure Reason has just been published on the appropriately-titled website Critique. This review (https://virtualcritique.wordpress.com/2016/11/20/michael-olson-on-colin-mcquillans-the-very-idea-of-a-critique-of-pure-reason/) is by Michael J. Olson of Macquarie University in Australia. I really appreciate Michael’s careful (and accurate!) reading of the book, as well as the methodological questions he raises. My response is here: https://virtualcritique.wordpress.com/2016/11/20/reply-to-michael-olson/

NDPR Review of The Very Idea of a Critique of Pure Reason

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews has just published a very interesting review of Immanuel Kant: The Very Idea of a Critique of Pure Reason by Riccardo Pozzo (National Research Council of Italy). Pozzo is one of my main interlocutors in my work on Kant’s logic, so I’m very pleased he called my Kant book an “erudite and seminal work of meticulous scholarship.”

Immanuel Kant: The Very Idea of a Critique of Pure Reason // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame

My chapter “Kant, Critique, and Enlightenment” will be included in Conceptions of Critique in Modern and Contemporary Philosophy, Edited by Ruth Sonderegger and Karin de Boer (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011). Other contributors include Judith Butler, Maeve Cook, Oliver Custer, Robin Celikates, Fabian Freyenhagen, Thijs Lijster, Christina Hendricks, Philip Andrew Quadrio, and Elizabeth Rottenberg.

My chapter is, essentially, the “Kant” chapter in the book, though Butler, Quadrio, and de Boer will be discussing Kant to some extent as well. I will be arguing that Kantian critique is not intended to establish the limits of reason but is, on the contrary, a demonstration of the possibility of the a priori cognition that makes metaphysics possible as a science.